Your Civic Duty

In case you haven’t been able to tell by the influx of political ads and media coverage, tomorrow is Election Day. Seats for the House and the Senate, as well as many local and state seats, are up for grabs. Tea Party candidates have completely shaken up the election scene, and for some seats, the only way to predict who will win is to wait for all of the votes to be counted.

It is your civic duty to vote tomorrow. While, ideally, I would have the readership to encourage everyone to vote Democrat, the main idea here is to just vote. But don’t vote for just anyone. Take the time to read the issues, examine the candidates, and vote for common sense.

There are plenty of crazy politicians out there (and Keith Olbermann in his Special Comment on Wednesday [two links] exposes the crazies in the Tea Party), and they come from all over. They are running simply because they want to oust the incumbents, but they don’t exactly have the best interests of the people in mind. Many times the stances they take have no ideological support; they are simply taking those stances because they think that’s what the people want.

It’s frustrating, especially in these last few months, to watch these ads and to listen to the debates and wonder why people this stupid are running for Congress. This frustration is a main reason why updates have been spotty at best–I would love to comment on everything stupid and inane that’s been going on in this election cycle, but there is so much going on that it’s hard to know where to start.

And sometimes, the stupidity is just so obvious that all I would need to do is post what was said, possibly with a string of personal attacks and curse words. As fun as that would be, I’m above that, and choose not to comment rather than get myself in trouble.

It is always important to vote, but never has it been more important than this cycle. President Obama, the Senate, the House, and all politicians should be working for the people, but it seems that when the politicians aren’t fighting with each other and filibustering and never getting anything done, they are campaigning.

Politicians say that they have your best interests in mind, but really, seriously, take a look at it. If your incumbent doesn’t appear to have your interests in mind, take them out. But replace them with someone who DOES have your best interests in mind. Look at the issues, look at the voting records, look at everything you can about the candidate. If you like what you see, get out and vote.

If you don’t like what you see, still vote. Other than candidates, there are plenty of things to vote on. In California, Proposition 19 will decide whether or not marijuana will be legalized. Referred Law 12 in South Dakota is the smoking ban law. Vote, and have your voice heard.

P.J. O’Rourke, Libertarian and political satirist, said Saturday on NPR, “The Government represents the will of the People, not the whim of the People.” If these Tea Party candidates get into office, what will they do once they accomplish their single issue? What is left for the Tea Party once they repeal “Obamacare” (a term that I’d be more than happy to have removed from our lexicon)?

Nothing. There will be two years of people with little to no political experience doing whatever they can to keep things moving in Washington.

Get out and vote on Tuesday. Vote for common sense. Vote for what you feel is the best option for your state and for your nation. Just don’t vote out of frustration. Vote for the betterment of all.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: